Jake Daley loves baseball. He loves playing for the Red Sox in the Woodside baseball league. He loves playing short stop. Most of all, he loves to win.

“Rapid-fire action sequences and surprising twists.”―School Library Journal

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Without his lucky glove, Jamie doesn’t believe in his ability to lead his baseball team to victory.

“[Bowen’s] pace is excellent and he has a knack for efficient evocation.”―The Washington Post

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Scott and his teammates can’t find an adult to coach their team, so they must find a leader among themselves.

“I would recommend this book to major baseball fans.”―Poughkeepsie Journal, Kids as Critics

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Trey is overjoyed when his lucky charm helps him make the travel team, but will his luck hold out?

“A solid choice for upper elementary readers as well as middle school collections looking to boost their hi-lo offerings.” ―School Library Journal

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Isaac learns the true meaning of a perfect game when he volunteers with a team of developmentally disabled players.

“An exciting story with lots of action.”―KidLitReviews

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Brendan is one of the best players in the league, but no matter how hard he tries, he can’t make his team win.

“Cubs fans of all ages (especially kids) will identify with the plight of a young Chicago boy.”―USA Today Baseball Weekly

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T.J. is smaller than his teammates and his pitches just don’t have the power to get batters out. When he learns about 1940s player Rip Sewell, he may have found a solution.

“Bowen is a natural when it comes to writing sports stories and informing his readers about the past.”―Newsday

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Isaac learns the true meaning of a perfect game when he volunteers with a team of developmentally disabled players.

“A baseball tale that should appeal to middle-grade fans.”―Booklist

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In order to win an important baseball game, twelve-year-old Kyle claims to have made a difficult catch, which he actually dropped.

“Bowen pitches a winner here.”―School Library Journal

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